Tuesday, 7 July 2009

Find The Fault No 17

Ah, this is more like it. But thank goodness Commentator Diplo is swanning around in Dorset, because I couldn't see him letting this one go without some fairly pointed comments about the poor artist's interpretation of the puzzle. A proper train, a slightly pale GWR loco and rake of carriages drawing into Paddington maybe, hot from the beach at Dawlish and the lush Thames Valley. Or perhaps it's pulling out, looking at all that steam. Anyway, only three more of these to go. What are we going to do on Tuesday mornings?

23 comments:

office pest said...

There b'aint be any cylinders on that thur ingine, 'less there's one 'idden insoide, boi. So it wudent goo along very well.

No reciprocating valve gear, neither.

Prob'ly a Southern Railway contraption then.

David said...

Looks like steam not smoke coming out of the funnel...

Peter Ashley said...

Sorry chaps, keep going. I told you it would be controversial

Vincent said...

The wheel flanges should be inside the rails not outside. (At last my London Underground & Eurotunnel experience is coming in useful again: I once went to Derby to carry out a second-party audit on the reconditioning of train wheels.)

office pest said...

I think it's on the wrong track (down not up or up not down) as well. Not surprising it's jumped the points with those way out flanges Vincent!

Peter Ashley said...

Vincent takes the prize. I'm so glad, I thought this one was going to run and run. Unlike the train, which would be derailed at Royal Oak. The card does indeed say: "Flanges of wheels should run inside rails".

Diplomate said...

In Dorset STOP Dial Up Connection STOP Send Golf Clubs STOP Heavy Rain STOP - MORE STEAM ! - STOP

Diplomate said...

actually doing a Ravensburger 1000 piecer of very similar scene STOP c/w pint of Palmers Gold STOP off to Swanage to ride some steam STOP

Jon Dudley said...

And it's taken me all this time to realise that the competition was on a Tuesday. Talk about thick. I was up betimes too - bugger! My guess is that the artist hadn't a clue which side the flanges should have been on anyway. OP makes a valid observation about the cylinders - saucy monkey with his Southern Rlwy. comments. Of course, as usual there are multitudinous answers such as why are the sleepers only the thickness of a packet of Rizlas...in fact why is there a portion of track with no sleepers at all? No repeat of the unfeasible No.4 identification anywhere else on the loco, etc.,etc. Worst of all there are no Gricers at the end of the platform with Thermos flasks, ex-army canvas bags, trousers at half-mast and 'Silvine' pocket exercise books at the ready. Break out the Ian Allen 'combined' volumes!

Peter Ashley said...

Don't talk to me about trainspotting Jon. I got so fed up with school pals waving their Ian Allans about I went and bought a combined volume and underlined everything in it except about 20 numbers or so. And then just left it lying on my desk.

Jon Dudley said...

Now why didn't I think of that! Mind you I was always claiming to have seen some extremely rare locomotive or other which in real life would never have appeared on our line...the cocky little know-alls of course immediately spotted my lies and consequently I was not invited to their forays to Old Oak Common and other temples of steam. Well, chiz to them, thy are fules and kno nothing. Not that I bear Molesworthian grudges or anything.

accountant said...

As ever the artist's use of perspective seems a bit iffy. as to what to do when the quiz runs out, have you no more interesting pieces of old packaging in yor collection mull over?

Peter Ashley said...

Don't you worry Accountant, I'll find something.

Ron Combo said...

Silvine! Now there's a word riven with memories!

Peter Ashley said...

I found some Silvine notebooks lurking in a local stationers on Saturday. Still got the original design on the front, as far as I could tell. Can't think why I didn't buy the lot.

Philip Wilkinson said...

I'd never have got the flanges.

I too saw some Silvine notebooks recently – in a shop in West Kensington, of all places. Perhaps they're still making them. We must all lay in stocks.

Bucks Retronaut said...

Weren`t Silvines the ones with all the multiplication tables ,avoirdupois thingies,and a county map of England all printed on the inside covers ?
Essential kit for any aspirant cheating financial advisor or corporate fraudster,let alone the trainspotters who were always seriously weird at my school ,They all wore NH specs with Very Thick Lenses and muttered amongst themselves about Dark Deeds in Nine Elms Shed. I have my suspicions.........and never ever want to find out !.

Jon Dudley said...

Good again Bucks, Nine Elms! the holy of holies for all Gricers. Despite visiting this temple of steam, many had some sort of Damascene experience and went over to bus spotting - also weird, and many of them worshippped the London Transport fleets. Aldgate bus depot was their Mecca, lair of the 'pre-war RT' class of double decker - a vehicle so esoteric that the spotters sometimes forgot to eat their jam sandwiches when one hove into view.

Personally, I found those tables on the back of the red exercise books really useful. Particularly the rods, poles and perches - which seemed so desrciptive...whoops, anti-metrication alert!

Peter Ashley said...

Blimey, you're up early Jon. I've not even had my Welgar Shredded Wheat yet. Don't know much about bus garages, but Aldenham in Hertfordshire is to be seen in the monochrome sequence at the beginning of Summer Holiday. Why am I ashamed to know that?

Jon Dudley said...

Up so early in fact that in an attempt to provide witty metaphors I mixed up christianity and the muslim faiths...maybe that should be done more often. Also can''t spell metrication either. Dammit - I remember the Summer Holiday scene too, Cliff drove the fastest bus in the world in that film. Give me Reg Varney, Blakey and Olive any day.

Jon Dudley said...

Bad day. See what I mean...it was 'descriptive' not 'metrication'. Write 'I must check my work more thoroughly' 100 times in your Silvine exercise book, Dudley

Forest Pines said...

Sorry to come into the discussion rather late, but I thought I should correct one misapprehension in your captioning. That is definitely not a Great Western engine. Whatever the abilities of the artist, he has - working from a photograph, presumably - captured rather well the general appearance and 'feel' of the front end of one of John Robinson's designs for the Great Central. Based on the wheel arrangement, the inside cylinders and the shape of the splashers, it's a member of GCR Class I, also known as LNER Class B2, or the 'Sir Sam Fay' class. I'm surprised the distinctive Robinson smokebox wasn't obvious to any of the other readers.

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