Thursday, 13 March 2014

His Nibs

 
You know how it is. You set yourself the task of finding one thing (in this case two 1980s chutney jars, don't ask) and you find that when you've finally exited the be-mildewed outhouse your kitchen table is groaning with piles of other stuff you've found. "Well I never, fancy seeing that again. How lovely". So why was it in there in the first place? There must be name for this. I'll call it the Slawston Syndrome to be going on with. This Silveroid Stainless Steel Fountain Pen Nib display card nearly made it into Unmitigated England, so perhaps in disgust at rejection it wrote itself into the brick outhouse. But it's a very timely reappearance, as there is now serious talk of a third Unmitigated England Book. Which I can't wait to start. Perhaps I'll try using one of the non-corrodible nibs to kick-off my thoughts. After all, it says they have '3 Degrees of Point'. I've had that myself sometimes.

8 comments:

The Vintage Knitter said...

An Unmitigated England the Third? What joy; it'll be able to keep I and II company on my bookshelf. By the way did you see that amazing collection of railwayana and automobilia on BBC2 last night? If not you're in for a treat...and prepare yourself for extreme envy!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03ybzg1

Peter Ashley said...

I did indeed see it VK. The railway and automobilia was extraordinary. A superb collection. I went very quiet (for once) when I saw all that Southern Region stuff. Particularly the beautiful green station signs for Rye and Ore

The Vintage Knitter said...

I certainly take my hat off to collectors such as those on that programme; especially the chap with the railway collection, nay - hoard. He's probably saved a lot of items from ticket stubs through to those stunning posters that would have been otherwise thrown away back in the 70s and earlier. Here's to the great British collector!

Peter Ashley said...

Yes, his was the most heartwarming because he could relate personally to his items, having worked as a signalman. I imagine in his younger days he saw much of this stuff extant.

Philip Wilkinson said...

Agreed about the railway collector. Fascinating and, yes a real connection to the stuff.

As far as the nibs go - you've got six there. At one per book (compare Thomas Hardy's dip pens) that's half a dozen sequels. You'd better get writing!

Sue said...

Does make you wonder what the missing nibs were used to write. Signing cheques and doing Latin homework or an undiscovered masterpiece? Look forward to Volume 3.

Stephen Barker said...

Peter, I have the syndrome too. In my case collecting letterpress posters for auction sales, etc is my current weakness. I have boxes filled with tins and other packaging, collections of In Memorium cards, postcards etc.
As regards today's post I have a card for Gillott's Superfine Drawing Pens with all 12 nibs and nib holder. The card announces that they were Pen Makers to the late King George V.

Peter Ashley said...

Mmm, Gillott's rings a bell from my days learning to be a 'commercial artist'. I think they did art board. It brings back memories of being a junior and waiting to be served in Drawing Office Requisites in Marble Street in Leicester. With a lady running about with rolls of Kodatrace and sheets of CS10, looking like Alice of WOOC(P) in the Len Deighton films, cigarette dangling from her lower lip.