Monday, 17 August 2009

Find The Fault No 35

Posting this week's puzzle picture a bit early, as Norfolk is beckoning for three days. Interesting one this, as the answer wasn't quite what I expected. Another nice drawing- I like that tug boat going by. We don't see them very often now, but I can just remember watching them fussing and nudging about in the Pool of London and beyond, and wishing I could hear them all sound their robust hooters on the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve. Tug boats. Once as ubiquitous in London life as black cabs and red buses.

12 comments:

Shades said...

The ship looks somewhat land-locked there in the dock

martin said...

I would hazard the uneducated guess that the boat pictured is-in real terms-far too large to be accommodated in the space its in.There will be people who will set me right,I'm sure.

Philip Wilkinson said...

Well, I certainly wouldn't want to reverse the ship through that gap. ('Left hand down a bit'....crash-clang....'Oh lummee...').

martin said...

Alternatively,its a dry dock that is obviously very wet.Beyond that,I can tell you nothing.(Collective sigh of relief)

Peter Ashley said...

Hmm. Tricky one this. But I have to say that Wilko is the nearest. The card does indeed say "The entrance to the dock is too small to allow the ship to enter or leave".

DC said...

Grrr! Gawain and I get up early to win the comp (and spotted it straight off) to find the winning horse is not just necking it at the post but already parading in the winner's enclosure (well done PW)! Such early running wouldn't wash on the good old CFF/SBB, I can tell you. Enjoy the Broads (fnarr, fnarr!) if that is where you are heading.

Diplomate said...

Bit obvious really - Peter, what was the answer you were expecting. I could throw a spanner in and point out that the Coronia was in fact a three funnel cruise liner of a tad over 82,000 ton displacement, well over 1000ft long, 118 ft in the beam and drafted nearly 40ft. Based on these facts i would have to say that the fault is in the ship's name. The narrow dock entrance must an error rather than a deliberate fault.

Bucks Retronaut said...

My initial impression was that this was perhaps a glitzed up,airbrushed,sanitized, politically correct hi-jacked impression of the Bordeaux Raid You know,Cockleshell Heroes and all that so as not to derange the equines.
Similar perhaps in concept to the way the Yanks annexed the glory in the latest Enigma fillum.
Sometimes I feel in need of professional help failing which perhaps another belt of Electric Soup might do the trick!
Nice post,by the way.

TIW said...

On sunday morning I watched a tug shove an ocean liner stern-first under Tower Bridge. The liner had been tied up next to HMS Belfast for a few days. Always nice to see the bridge raised for something substantial.

Thud said...

The sound of horns booming out from the Mersey on a foggy night is something that will stay with me forever.

Martin H. said...

I reckon the ship is a Cunard Line vessel (red and black funnels) in which case it must be the RMS Caronia. Why the artist thought it necessary to alter the name I can't imagine.
There were two Caronias - the twin funnel one was launched in 1904, and the single funnel one in 1949. This latter ship was painted a fetching shade of pale green and I have a rather nice Minic model of it.

martin said...

Its been good. I've enjoyed contributing the occasional unnecessary and completely irrelevant comment.Is that the time? I'll get my coat