Wednesday, 27 April 2011

Iron Filing

In accordance with my New Year resolution to try and stop driving by interesting things without photographing them, I give you the remains of an old cottage in Blaston, Leicestershire. For years it has been covered in ivy, and the ground surrounding it a heaven of tangled undergrowth from which sprouted a few beehives. "I really must hop over the gate and photograph that" I muttered to myself every time I drove by. The thing is it's very near my home, and I see it virtually every day. So there was always another time. Until last week, when I saw that the ground had been cleared and levelled, and an ominous planning application poster was tied to a metal five bar gate. Last chance then, so I saw the other side of the cottage for the first time. It was like seeing an old friend suddenly stripped of their clothing, if you'll forgive my doubtful analogy. Just the bare bones really, but nevertheless an interesting object lesson on various building materials. I'm so glad I stopped and recorded it. For certain it will never be seen like this again.

11 comments:

Diplomate said...

peter - you mustn't worry, I'm sure the building will remain unmolested in its present state, I can't think for a minute anybody would want to change a thing.

The Vintage Knitter said...

A lovely photo; the deep orangey-red of the roof contrasts well against that sky.

TIW said...

That cut-out bit on the front make me think that it must have once had a thatched roof.

Not that I am in any way qualified to hold this opinion, y'unnerstand.

Peter Ashley said...

It all goes to show that corrugated iron does work in so many cases where it's often assumed it won't. I think it was almost certainly thatched previously, but I wish I could share Diplo's unbounded optimism for its future. Still, watch this space as they say; I will report on what happens to this little gem.

Barrie @ APS said...

Lovely building Peter. I think you'll find that it is still thatched under the wriggly tin. I know of two houses, one in North Kilworth and the other in Dunton Bassett, that had C.I rooves. When the covering was removed during renovation/restoration the original thatch was still there. There is also, last time I was there, a house in Walton that has a wriggly tin roof.

I remember reading somewhere that covering thatch with C.I. was common in the 1940's as it was cheaper and easier than re-thatching.

I'm rather partial to wriggly tin rooves especially when they have been painted with red lead/red oxide and then faded by the sun.

killemallletgodsortemout said...

Reminds me of my Grandparents' farm house in Eire. Thatch was replaced by crinkly tin in the 60s.

Lovely photo, by the way.

Philip Wilkinson said...

Lovely rich colours - tin roof, wall (is that mud?) and the surrounding soil too.

Peter Ashley said...

From what I could see, most of the walls are mud and plaster, with repairs and the end elevations in brick.

Stephen Barker said...

According to the planning application the cottage is to be restored with a thatch roof with an extension and garage. There are black and white photos showing the cottage as was and the motley selection of sheds that surrounded it as part of the planning application which can be found on Market Harborough District Council's website.

Ron Combo said...

One home fewer for owls or bats?

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