Wednesday, 14 October 2009

Chain Saw Reaction




Elsewhere on this blog I have drawn attention to the remarkable history of Scots Pines in the landscape. The tree here is opposite my home, and is in all probability a truncated Wellingtonia. There is a Scots Pine next to it, positioned at what was once a crossroads, now a T-junction at the centre of the village, but this magnificent specimen is one of the tallest and most magnificent trees in the area. So of course the good folk in whose garden it stands want to chop it down. And why? Because after the removal of a brick arch that allowed for any movement of the tree roots, the replacement wall with foundations is now prone to damage. And of course this might well effect the smooth operation of an electronic gate. Heaven forbid. The wholesale destruction of trees is usually the preserve of over-zealous councils in a deadly pact with contractors to avoid what they perceive is litiguous action. But for a private individual to destroy a tree as old and as important to the local scene and history as this one is thoroughly reprehensible. There might be some point if the roots were interfering with household wainscoting, plumbing, televisions and wi-fi's, but irresponsible destruction of this kind should surely be a very last resort. It just isn't any threat to anything important, and attempts to fell it before have apparently failed because of the good sense of those brought in to do the deed who have driven off shaking their heads. Not so now. I understand a chainsaw is being primed far away in an adjoining county. And yes, I believe there's a Tree Preservation Order on it.

9 comments:

The Crap Blog Detective said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
newton said...

It is a sad fact nowadays that magnificent trees are being felled (more & more in rural areas) because they either block out light to the house or garden, or that the leaves or needles rain down onto the car in the driveway. Why buy a house with these wonderful
specimens if you wish to chop them down. I do agree that the cheque book will probably prevail.

Anonymous said...

I suppose we should all live au naturale in huts in the woods then.

Thud said...

As a serial inhabiter of tree surrounded old houses I have yet to find a house not in equalibrium with its surrounding trees....leave well alone.

Philip Wilkinson said...

Thud: Absolutely. You can sometimes do more damage to the fabric of a building by cutting down a tree than by leaving it be.

If they do cut it down, is it too much to hope that they plant another a little farther away?

accountant said...

They probably are acting on the advice of a surveyor, as they do not like trees growing near houses. Have tried threatening them with social isolation if they cut the tree down, or do they not take part in village life?

Diplomate said...

social isolation eh/ - fantastic -I'll have some of that.

Wendy Edmond said...

I have only just seen this website and the item on the tree. It is a shame that some people choose not to put their name to their comments, and others don't know the full circumstances behind the application. It is not my tree but I do know that the roots are lifting the pavement and have done so for many years despite the best efforts of the council. One older resident of the village has fallen as a result of tripping over the roots. The electric gates were only installed after three burglaries. Such trees, while very beautiful, are surely unsuitable for domestic gardens near several houses and footpaths. The owners of the tree have planted many trees on their land and plan to plant many more.