Tuesday, 27 October 2009

Find The Fault No 45

Well, what can I say. There are enough 'faults' here to keep us going for some time I should think. My main concern is why a 1950's caravan manufacturer should employ the services of an Italian hearse designer to do the interiors. Good luck with this one.

29 comments:

ChrisP said...

This bounder is clearly towing a caravan in the beautiful West Country, where such vile contrivances are happily unknown.
And he has no rear lights either on his car or his guastly trailer.

ChrisP said...

And he can't spell ghastly, the cad.

DC said...

That's one pimped-up Minor Traveller!

DC said...

Shouldn't the caravan's wheels be on its latitudinal apex, not towards the rear?

Though it's the sudden outbreak of frost on the otherwise sunny hilltop that's really intriguing.

DC said...

The Traveller has also been so over-pimped as to lose its rear passenger door!

Vincent said...

I'm normally a nitpicker. But all I can say is that it looks very wrong generally.

Peter Ashley said...

Thanks everyone. All good and correct thinking, but not what's on the answer card. The only clue I'll give is that this is possibly the most obscure one we've had. Unless you had to tow a caravan in the fifties...

office pest said...

Is the "On Tow" sign what's missing?

(Apart from the lights, centre of gravity, good taste, practicality, etc already mentioned).

DC said...

The car lacks wing-mirrors, presumably they are still being styled at Cowley, Crewe, Detroit or Palermo - given the stylistic mix of this vehicular ensemble here it could be any of these.

Peter Ashley said...

Well done Office Pest. The card says: "The trailer is not displaying a large T to indicate that it is being towed".

office pest said...

Hmm, well now, is it that the caravan is too big for the car? Caravans were quite small in ye olden dayes to limit the load on the towing car for practical and safety reasons.

Car engines were easy to overheat, blow head gaskets, crack the block, and, the brakes were typically drums all round and not so good at stopping at the best of times, never mind with a ton of steel and mahogany van waggling around behind.

office pest said...

I shall now argue amongst myself.

Vincent said...

And another thing. The caravan is so close to the car that it's hard to see how the ensemble could navigate sharp bends.

Philip Wilkinson said...

Took the words out of my mouth, Vincent. And another thing. The caravan doesn't have any of those little legs that you wind down so it's stable when you leave it in a field and buzz off to the pub in the alleged Traveller.

DC said...

Not sure about that, PW; the legs are usually concealed while driving and wound-down in situ - otherwise they'd catch and grate on the road.

ADC said...

No 'ON TOW' sign? How else is a caravan going to be traversing the countryside lanes, if it's not on tow?

Philip Wilkinson said...

DC: I thought about that and concluded that you'd be able to see the legs poised beneath the bodywork or sticking out like little exhaust pipes. But I admit I have not done extensive research in this area: you're probably right.

Bucks Retronaut said...

Deerbarn Road,Guildford,just up from the Wooden Bridge,bol**cksed towbar,expensive tow,Pride and Clarke,Composite Vehicles, A3,Cooksbridge Farm, Fernhurst,
Professional Help was (and is) always welcomed.

Martin H. said...

As a one-time owner I can tell you that any resemblance between the illustration and the hallowed Morris Traveller is purely coincidental.
So what is it? My best gueuss is an Austin 16 Countryman, circa 1947. I'm sure I've seen something vaguely similar on a Ford Pilot chassis, too.

Oh yes, and surely the purpose of the 'On Tow' sign was to reassure the following traffic jam that the ensemble had not actually parked?

Martin H. said...

That's also my best guess.....

DC said...

Martin H, looking here:

http://www.austinworks.com/woodies.html

I think you are right; it looks very like the Shooting Brake (fabulous name!).

I must, while writing, apologise for an earlier faux-pas; the Traveller, of course, had no rear passenger door.

But can anyone identify a likely candidate for the model of the caravan?

Peter Ashley said...

The FTF artist doesn't really appear to accurately use reference material, prefering to be more generic. Having said that I fully expect to hear that the caravan is the Roadblocker Adventurer Mk2.

expat said...

Do any vehicles in this series of cards have rear lights?

Peter Ashley said...

You've mentioned this anomaly before Expat, so I've had a look back over the Fault Cards and of course you're absolutely right. Disregarding liners and aeroplanes, every vehicle that should have rearlights singularly fails to have them. Maybe they've got no brakes either and don't go out at night.

Diplomate said...

ah - back now - Rego is 1967, car is mid forties. Could possibly be an ex-army staffer demobbed in '67 and put on the civilian register, thin story if you ask me and yet another example of the artist's shabby attitude to detail - not a helpful trait in one compiling FTF cards.

Anonymous said...

the caravan's windows are opened and the back window is broken, but the curtains stay still.

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